Wrapping up Christmas and Scoring Big in 2014

Do you remember the day-after-Christmas as a child?

It can be a big let down. As a child I probably got everything on my list. I didn’t want anything more, yet the let-down feeling was there. Why? Looking back, it probably was because there was no need to anticipate. The activity of anticipation brings excitement into the dull, everyday events of life. Children know these days as filled with chores of making of beds, washing dishes and the hated task of folding socks. (I still hate folding socks to this day. What’s the use, they never match!)

The value of anticipation.

Anticipation is part of “HOPE” when you think about it. You expect a change, hope for something different. The artist expects to be delighted with the finished project. Anticipation drives the brush or pencil towards the image in the mind. The same goes for the composer.

Maybe it’s the hopeful look of appreciation in the receiver’s eye’s that drives the giver to shop and wrap each present. I wonder what God anticipated that first Christmas. Does He even do that? Did He think of the joy of having a restored relationship with you? And me? The human psyche is a complex subject, yet I have confidence God understands it all. So much of His design for worship fills the needs of the human to understand his place in the relationship with God.

Long term VS Short Term Goals – IT’S RELATIVE

Mothers of toddlers have ONLY short – very short-term goals – such as going to the bathroom before the next catastrophe. For the child, each day drags on forever. Lunch is way out in the future. Supper will never come.

The act of anticipation is a serious, long term commitment to a six year old.

2013 ornament

The little track house made big memories.

I remember my siblings and I would insist on decorating the obligatory shrubs in suburban landscaping. The snow would settle on top of the large colorful bulbs and when they were plugged in, it looked like five, humungous M&M cookies lining the front walkway. We watched our Dad string them up and we waited for snow.  When it came we were ecstatic. So it made sense to give this memory back to our parents this Christmas.

So, maybe looking forward to meeting goals gives us the same excitement and sense of satisfaction as adults.

If that’s the case, I’m making both long term and short term goals to fill my life and keep me young at heart and mind.

Artistically, I would like to complete at least eight pieces this year – 3 acrylics, 2-3 pastels and the rest in graphite and/or  inks. Motivation for this should be easy since I’m starting a commission piece this week. Musically,  I would like to take 4-6 of my arrangements which have been floating around in my head (a dangerous place to store anything valuable) and notate them for solo piano. Some of my goals may be very dull to you – organization, for example – and one challenging – memorization of more Scripture. (I’m still working on Philippians 4:5-11).

What goals have you set? I’d love to hear of them.

May your days be blessed and have a joyous New Year.

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Visits in Time

The Catalyst

I just returned from a visit to my two Texan sisters. I am 3 dozen eggs lighter on the return and a couple bags of clothing heavier from Deb. I brought the eggs down to prove to Deb that baby chicks don’t hop out when you crack them just because we offer fertile, free-range eggs. At least I spared her the goose eggs.

Yes, it was hot, Yes, we spent most of the time chatting in the pool. Yes, we had fun. Topics ranged from the July 1st death of Peter Falk (I love Columbo movies) to childhood neighbors trying to sell their houses. In fact, some topics brought up would never have crossed our minds a decade or so ago. Normally, the time would be ripe for old-age jokes, but just telling you – we compared 401K and retirement plans, wills and those golden year aspirations.

Repertoire

Change is inevitable. We’re not just talking sagging bodies here. Circumstances change and shape our outlooks. Life experiences shape our coping mechanisms, our likes and dislikes. The song we obsessed over as a high school student seems silly now. Yet, we involuntarily respond to “That Song” that symbolized a bond we had with special people in our lives.

Now my brother may have played “Ole Yeller” until the record warpped but I couldn’t stand songs that made me cry. Give me “Along Came John” over “God Didn’t Make Little Green Apples” any day. Of course, my genre really included “Climb Every Mountain” and “To Dream the Impossible Dream” but I grew up in the age where the pop culture did not speak for me. Other than “Hey Jude, and “I Want to hold Your Hand” I couldn’t name the top hits except for Simon and Garfunkel’s two songs I liked: “Sounds of Silence and “Like A Bridge Over troubled Water.” I still prefer sacred, religious and inspirational music (along with the classics) that carried me past my school days through my adult years.

What are your favorite songs over your lifetime?

As a musician, do you try to update your repertoire? If you haven’t mastered playing by ear, have you purchased music you love and learned it – memorized it? This is the time. No classes. No grades. Just your heart wanting to speak through the keys. Try it.

What are your (cherished) Christmas Memories?

This little exercise helps if you had an older brother. One good reason – he’d come up with the most ingenious ideas that a younger sister would never even voice. Better yet, he would get get the blame. In fact, my brother is the only person I know of who actually GOT COAL in his stocking one Christmas. What better Christmas can one have! Like the time “X” (there’s no way I’ll spill the beans) had to show me something. As soon as Mom was safely down the street, he pulls me into a bedroom that had the little hole in the closet ceiling that leads into the attic. He pops up the square insert and feels around the attic floor a bit. Down comes a small package addressed to neither of us. He shakes it. We can’t guess so up it goes and he feels around a bit more. After repeating this a couple more times, he gets impatient and pulls himself closer to the hole and feels around again. He found the Christmas popcorn balls. What a find! (Parents loved these because they usually helped fill the stocking, especially in the leaner years). We ate either one or one apiece, I can’t remember. I do remember Mom asking Dad several days later where he put the treats for the stockings. Did “X” eat the rest while I wasn’t there?

My brother was really good at ferreting such important info out. I remember a few years later when he got his comeuppance, though. When it was safe, he had to show me the new hideout for Christmas. As usual, he pulls out a present and read the label. He put it down and pulled out another gift. I could tell he wasn’t happy and it wasn’t just his scowl. “What’s wrong?” I asked. There were no names on the gifts, only numbers-the game was up!